Nevada Leave Laws

January 8th 2024

A firm grasp of leave laws is indispensable for employers seeking to safeguard their workforce and for employees to assert their entitled benefits.

This article will examine the legal obligations pertaining to leave in Nevada and the different categories of leave that employees can avail themselves of.

It is crucial to acknowledge that the specific provisions that pertain to employers in the public and private sectors may vary when it comes to leave.

In Nevada, leave days are divided into two classifications: mandatory and non-mandatory, each encompassing unique guidelines and prerequisites.

This Article Covers

Nevada Required Leave
Nevada Non-Required Leave

Nevada Required Leave

Specific types of leave are legally required in Nevada and employees have the right to request and take such leave without facing any negative consequences from their employer. These leave types include:

1. Sick Leave

  • Eligibility: Private companies with 50 employees.
  • Duration:
    40 hours of paid sick leave for full-time staff.
    One hour of paid sick leave for every 52 hours worked for part-time employees (0.01923 hours of paid leave for each hour worked).
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: For various required purposes related to illness.

2. Family And Medical Leave

  • Eligibility:
    Employers with over 50 employees.
    Employees who have worked for their employer for at least a year with 1,250 work hours.
  • Duration:
    12-week period of unpaid absence from work within a year.
    26 weeks of unpaid leave for employees who need to take care of a member of the Armed Forces (spouse, parent, child, or next of kin) with a serious health condition, or injury, or undergoing medical treatment or therapy.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: For various reasons related to medical and familial responsibilities, including taking care of oneself or a family member with a serious health condition, a newly-born child, or an adopted/fostered child.

3. Vacation Leave

  • Eligibility: 
    Employers with 50 employees.
    After 90 days of employment, with a request reasonably in advance.
  • Duration: At least an hour of paid vacation leave for every 52 hours worked.
    Employers are allowed to limit vacation leave to 40 hours per year.

  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To take a vacation. Unused vacation time can be compensated for upon termination, with some exceptions.

4. Jury Duty Leave

  • Eligibility: Employees who are called for jury duty.
  • Duration: The scheduled and expected duration of the jury service.
    Employees who spend 4 hours serving on the jury cannot be scheduled to work a shift between 5 p.m. and 3 a.m. the following day.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To serve on a jury when summoned for jury duty.

5. Voting Time Leave

  • Eligibility: Voter employees.
  • Duration: Depending on the distance between the workplace and the voting location: 1 hour for up to 2 miles, 2 hours for 2-10 miles, and 3 hours for over 10 miles.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To vote in any local, regional, state or comparable election.

6. Parental Leave

  • Eligibility:
    Employers with over 50 employees (paid or unpaid)
    Working parents or guardians.
  • Duration: Up to 4 hours.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To attend any school-related activities of their children.

7. Military Leave

  • Eligibility: All employees serving in the US Armed Forces, the National Guard, or the state militia.
  • Duration: The scheduled duration of duty.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To take leave to serve in the US Armed Forces, National Guard, or state militia. Employees are entitled to the same benefits and pay increases upon return to work. 

8. Witness Leave

  • Eligibility: Employees who receive court summons.
    Employers must give their employees the option of paid or unpaid leave.

  • Duration: The scheduled and expected duration of the service.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To serve when subpoenaed as a witness.

9. Domestic or Sexual Assault Leave

  • Eligibility: Employees who have worked for the employer for at least 90 days and are victims of domestic or sexual violence, or have a family member who is.
  • Duration: Up to 160 hours per year.
  • Circumstance for Utilizing Leave: To address various needs, including seeking medical treatment or counseling, participating in legal proceedings, or creating a safety plan (e.g. relocating).

If you want to know more about the rights of employees in Nevada, you can read our guides on your rights as a salaried employee in Nevada, and your rights as an hourly employee in Nevada

Nevada Non-Required Leave

Nevada leave laws do not mandate employers to offer the following types of leave to their employees:

1. Bereavement Leave

Nevada employers do not have to provide their employees with bereavement leave.

2. Holiday Leave

Employers in Nevada aren’t obligated to provide their employees with time off for holiday celebrations as a type of leave.

The following are the official federal holidays observed in the US:

State Official Holidays Date
New Year’s Day 1 January
Martin Luther King Jr. Civil Rights Day Third Monday in January
Washington’s Birthday Third Monday in February
Memorial Day Last Monday in May
Independence Day 4 July
Labor Day First Monday in September
Columbus Day Second Monday in October
Election Day Every other year
Veterans Day 11 November
Thanksgiving Day Fourth Thursday in November
Christmas Day 25 December

Learn more about Nevada Labor Laws through our detailed guide.

Important Cautionary Note

When making this guide we have tried to make it accurate but we do not give any guarantee that the information provided is correct or up-to-date. We therefore strongly advise you seek advice from qualified professionals before acting on any information provided in this guide. We do not accept any liability for any damages or risks incurred for use of this guide.